Every cricket team needs a dressing-room pest | ESPNcricinfo.com – ESPNcricinfo

Doug was apologetic and rapidly got a towel to mop up the stain. Regardless of Les shouts of “escape me”, Doug demanded assisting and asked, “Now, wheres the area on your suit?”
When Les pointed to the area, all that remained was a small, clear wet area. At this point the dressing space erupted in laughter and Les, like numerous an Australian player before him, was required to select in between joining the frivolity or smacking Doug on the jaw.
This was Doug Walters on a typical cricket tour; I hate to think what dastardly deeds he would create with the additional time on his hands supplied by lockdown mode.
I sense that nothing would change my tune. Ive frequently said I would have hated to explore without Walters. Every group needs one, a dressing-room insect who keeps the team loose in times of terrific tension.

International cricket is finally returning after a Covid-19-induced hiatus with an England v West Indies Test series. It wont rather be cricket as weve known it, but however it will be something to see – at least on television – after months of lockdown and longing. For the players it will be a case of attempting to perform at their best in a bio-secure bubble without crowds.
This will need the obligatory talent and decision to flourish at the greatest level, in addition to the odd piece of luck. Theres another component that groups might discover helpful in an era of extra tension: the dressing-room bug.
The man who, regardless of all the pressure that constructs throughout a five-day contest, still retains the ingenuity to drive his team-mates to interruption with a series of pranks. Oh, and it likewise helps if that same person can hold up his end of the bargain on the field; its much better his team-mates are chuckling with him and not at him.
In an age of lockdowns, isolation and bio-secure bubbles, this kind of character will be even more essential to a teams success.
I had the good luck to have fun with such a cricketer for the bulk of my career: Kevin Douglas Walters.
Off, Walters was a match-winner. A player of extraordinary skill who scored a century in each of his very first 2 Tests and typically had the happy propensity of claiming a “B-b-b-bloody beauty, one for none” when thrown the ball. A player who, regardless of impersonating an owl (he did a lot of hootin and hollerin late during the night), still managed to average 48 in his Test career.
Just for good step, three of his 15 Test centuries were completed inside a session. He was likewise the first Test batsman to score a double and a single century in the exact same match.
On trips of the UK, his first stop was Carnaby Street, not since he looked for the fashions of the day, no. He headed straight for the magic shop where he happily caught such non-traditional products as itching powder and disappearing ink.
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When he wasnt playing cards and cigarette smoking in the dressing room, he would wander around patting team-mates on the back of the neck. This evident gesture of motivation was considerably valued until his team-mate realised they now had an itch they could not scratch.
Our amiable assistant supervisor on the 1968 tour, Les Truman, acquired a white match, which was better for the warm climates of his home town Perth than a grim London day in May. When Doug was writing his daily letter house, Truman erred in happily displaying his new purchase in the Lords dressing space at a time.
Suddenly in dire need of a refill for his water fountain pen, Doug tripped on a tactically placed cricket bag and spilled the contents of his ink bottle over Les brand brand-new suit.
Les was apoplectic, cursing Walters with, “Who uses a fountain pen nowadays anyway?”

International cricket is finally returning after a Covid-19-induced hiatus with an England v West Indies Test series. It will not rather be cricket as weve understood it, however nonetheless it will be something to watch – at least on tv – after months of lockdown and longing. A gamer of exceptional skill who scored a century in each of his very first two Tests and often had the happy flair of claiming a “B-b-b-bloody beauty, one for none” when tossed the ball. A gamer who, despite impersonating an owl (he did a lot of hootin and hollerin late at night), still managed to typical 48 in his Test profession.
He was also the very first Test batsman to score a double and a single century in the same match.